Factors Shaping Labour Market Participation

Authors

  • Ana-Maria Zamfir PhD, National Scientific Research Institute for Labour and Social Protection, Bucharest, Romania
  • Anamaria Năstasă Research Assistant, National Scientific Research Institute for Labour and Social Protection, Bucharest, Romania
  • Anamaria Beatrice Aldea Researcher, National Scientific Research Institute for Labour and Social Protection, Bucharest, Romania
  • Raluca Mihaela Molea Research Assistant, National Scientific Research Institute for Labour and Social Protection, Bucharest, Romania

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18662/po/12.1/247

Keywords:

labour market participation, employment outcomes, work-related expectations, World Values Survey

Abstract

Like other postmodern structures, post-industrial labour markets display more frequent and rapid changes and higher unpredictability. In these conditions, the world of work is less capable in providing individuals stable signals for the construction of their behaviours. This paper aims to examine both macro and micro factors that shape labour market participation and expectations related to employment outcomes. We explore statistical data from the World Values Survey Wave 7 (2017-2020) collected from almost seventy thousands individuals around the world. Focusing on subjective evaluations of expected employment outcomes, our results are relevant for better understanding labour market participation from a postmodern perspective.

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Published

2021-03-19

How to Cite

Zamfir, A.-M., Năstasă, A., Aldea, A. B., & Molea, R. M. (2021). Factors Shaping Labour Market Participation. Postmodern Openings, 12(1), 91-101. https://doi.org/10.18662/po/12.1/247

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Section

Research Articles

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